Tag: utah running

RACE #146: Provo City Half Marathon

This past week has been a struggle — to say the least. After getting sick during the Salt Flats 50K last Friday my whole weekend and most of this past week was simply derailed. I’m still not 100%, but I am past the flu and bronchitis and I feel much, much better.

Having DNF’d the Salt Flats 50K and DNS’d the Tulip Festival Half — I was ready for a race success this weekend. Not even a success, just a race. And, this was the perfect rebound race. Especially since I was pacing the 3:35 time (basically the sweeper).

I’ve always enjoyed running the Provo City Half. It’s a fun course that starts at South Fork up Provo Canyon and then drops down to University Blvd. by way of the Provo River Trail. It’s not a super fast canyon race, but it has a good combination of downhill and nice rolling hills.

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I was excited to not just run this course, but to be pacing it with my really good friend Tricia Wilkins. This shouldn’t have been our first foray into pacing. Back in 2014 we were suppose to pace the Thankful 13 together, but we got separated in the corral and lost each other. I tried to catch up as I was pushing Elsha, but we just never did.

So this race was pretty much making up for that failure.

And, it didn’t disappoint. Especially since we were also joined by Tricia’s husband Cory. It was a REAL party now!

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I carpooled down from Bountiful to Provo with Carla and Reese Thorne. It was nice because I got to bypass the bus shuttle up the canyon since Reese has his cart. As much as I enjoy bus shuttles up canyons, I also like avoiding losing an extra hour of sleep — it was nice not having to leave for Provo an hour earlier.

The race start at the South Fork Park up Provo Canyon near Vivian Park — and in year’s past it’s pretty dang cold. So I always come prepared with a fairly heavy and/or layers, but when we got up the canyon I was fairly surprised how warm it was — my jacket was hardly needed. Which is good and bad — bad, meaning, it meant the valley was going to be fairly hot.

But, since I was pacing 3:35 I wasn’t too worried about the heat. Plus, I brought my backpack which still packed from the previous week’s 50K misadventure. I had some water leftover along with bacon jerky, applesauce, Swedish Fish, some Honey Stingers and a first aid kit. So, I was pretty much set for anything between an empty stomach to the apocalypse.

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After the gun sounded and we corralled everyone toward the starting line we made the decent down the canyon. I love the Vivian Park portion of the canyon, especially during the spring — not only is the canyon beautiful, but you also get some great views of Timp as well. It’s gorgeous.

We fartleked down the canyon trying to keep a good pace while trying not to frighten the people ahead of us much. As much as I love sweeping and pacing the last pacing times — I also know how much the people in the back don’t want to see you, especially early in the race. I’ve had a few run ins with runners in the past that came close to cursing me out at miles 2-3 or so. And, I don’t blame them! No one wants to be passed by the sweeper.

After our fartlek down Vivian Park the course took us down the Provo River Trail — which is even prettier than South Fork and Vivian Park. After passing Bridal Veil Falls and switching under the highway we kept the party going with dance parties (Tricia brought Bluetooth speakers), squats and plenty of laughing. It really was a party in the back.

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It was a blast.

Around miles 7-8 the course dumped us onto University Blvd. toward the finish line. I was a bit worried about getting to this point, because I was expecting it to be pretty hot — since it warm up the canyon. But, I was relieved to see cloud cover as a storm was approaching Provo. It didn’t look particularly nasty — so the cloud coverage was welcomed.

As we got closer to the finish line we were joined by the Petrossi’s — Timothee and Jennifer — who planned on grabbing a Slurpee and running in with us. They are both a part of Team Addict II Athlete and it was really touching to have them run with us, because it reminded so much of last year’s Provo City Half when the team ran me in on that same home stretch — because nobody runs alone on Team AIIA.

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At mile 12.5 we hopped off course monetarily and grabbed our Slurpees. Though it wasn’t scorching hot — the Slurpees were manna to my lips — and cooled me down. It was perfect. So, with our Slurpees in hand we headed toward the finish line for our victorious finish picture! And, thanks to Jorge we got some sweet photos!

But, we were done! We did it! We may of been a tad past our pace, but that didn’t matter much. We lingered a bit at the finish line to cheer in some of the runners behind us as we finished the last of our Slurpees.

I just felt great. Having finished the race helped erase a lot of discouragement of my previous week. And, being able to just get out and run was something I couldn’t imagine earlier in the week after overcoming the flu and bronchitis.

My only regret was that my ankle was pretty sore, but that was my own fault — as I realized afterward I forgot to wear my sports brace. But, after icing it throughout the weekend I should be okay. But, it is one of the reasons why I planned on backing out of the Ogden Marathon distance. That foot on pavement for 26.2 miles would just be too much.

Anyways — my next race isn’t until Memorial Day weekend at the Jordan River Half Marathon. I’m planning on getting some good running in, but at the same time I am taking it easy to let my body and ankle heal a bit. It needs it, because I feel it.

But, this race was a victory and such a fun memory I will remember among my 180 journey.


MY NEXT FIVE RACES


Everyone needs a Dave in their life. This past week has been pretty stressful. Between overcoming the flu and bronchitis while juggling two jobs, it’s been a tough and stressful week. Tonight after work my plan was to dive head first into some pending projects I need done by Monday, but that kind of got derailed when I got a call from Dave asking to hang out because his Mom wasn’t home. I had a million reasons to say no, but I just couldn’t decline his request. I knew he didn’t want to be alone. So I told him he could come over and watch some basketball while I worked on my computer. When he got to our house he told me how he felt sad for his Mom and how she wasn’t having a very good week. He then told me that he wanted to cheer her up and wanted to go get flowers for her. I knew this meant I wasn’t going to be spending much of the evening at home as planned, so I hopped in the car and headed to the store with Dave. My heart melted watching Dave pick out some flowers, chocolates and a card for his Mom. The love and admiration he has for her is truly special. And, as I stood next to him as he was making these choices, I just couldn’t help but recognize that I needed this pause. I needed this reminder of what life is about. Dave has provided many of these kind of moments during our friendship. I don’t know how I got so lucky to call him “friend,” but I truly cherish his friendship. And, I am truly grateful for these many little lessons and reminders he teaches me.

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RACE #146: Provo City Half Marathon (3:35) After the previous weekend’s debacle of DNFs and DNSs and subsequent illness, this was a nice rebound race. I paced 3:35 alongside Tricia and her husband … we were essentially “the sweepers.” But, we had a blast! We had dance parties, made new friends, grabbed Slurpees at Mile 12.5 and made sure there was a party in the back! I wasn’t 100% with my lingering cough and ankle, but the situation was perfect where those weren’t a factor. I’m taking a little more time off to rest my sprained ankle. But, come later this month I should be ready for the Jordan River Half on the 27th. But, I’m still enjoying this moment and race and being able to party on with my dear friends throughout the 13.1 miles! Such a fun time! #provocityhalf #race146 #running @joshruns180 @fight4phat @josherwalla @myracemedals @ryrpacers @run13utah

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Newborns always make the best drunk faces.

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I always love a good graduation ceremony, but I won’t lie … five minutes into it, I’m ready for it to be over.

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Somebody’s feeling pretty.

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Weekly Miles

Running Miles — 5.5 miles
Race Miles — 13.1 miles
Walking Miles — 19.47 miles
TOTAL MILES — 38.07 miles
Race(s) this week — Provo City Half Marathon

May 2017 Miles

Running Miles — 5.5 miles
Race Miles — 13.1 miles
Walking Miles — 19.47 miles
TOTAL MILES — 38.07 miles
Races in May — Provo City Half Marathon and Jordan River Half Marathon.

2017 Miles

Running Miles — 210.75 miles
Race Miles — 164.52 miles
Walking Miles — 439.88 miles
TOTAL MILES — 815.15 miles
Races done in 2017 — New Year’s Half Marathon, Sweethearts 5K, Jackpot Running Festival, SL Tri Club Indoor Half, March Madness Half, Lucky 13 Half Marathon, Emigration Canyon Half Marathon, Riverton Half, Saltair Half and Provo City Half Marathon.


RACE #144: Riverton Half Marathon

Six years ago when I made the goal to run 180 races (half marathon or longer) before I turned 40, I had no idea that y age 36 I’d be nearly done with that goal. And, that really speaks volumes of how much running has changed and influenced my life these past half dozen years.

Up until about two years ago I had the IDEA of slowing down a bit and evening out the number of races so I could hit my goal in 2021. But, that never happened. Partly, because I used many races as training runs for ultras, but also, because, I didn’t want to slow down.

Okay, that could be the only reason.

Regardless, I changed my timeline for the goal to next year. I am now planning to run race 180 in July 2018. And, of course it will be where I started this crazy journey — the Bountiful Handcart Days Half Marathon.

Because, of this new timeline goal I’ve looked at my race schedule for the next 18 or so months and planned each race one out leading up to the race. I should have about 30 or so races this year, which is a lot for me. But, I have the goal in sight and many of these races are great ultra training for me.

It’s been tricky finding races, because I’m not able to put the many, many Runtastic Events races I love — Timp Half, Nebo Half, The Haunted Half, etc., etc., etc. — because I’m working for them now. So, I’ve had to find races to replace those on my schedule and I’ve had to find a few small races to put on my schedule that I normally wouldn’t. I’m not complaining, because a run is a run to me and I do like new challenges and new courses.

And, that’s what kind of lead me to run the Riverton Half Marathon. This isn’t a new race to me. I’ve run it twice before. Once in 2012 and again in 2014. It’s put on by the city — and it’s honestly not that bad. The registration fee is extremely reasonable — $30 for early bird and $40 if you procrastinate.

But, you also get what you pay for. It’s not a race done by thousands. There were a couple hundred or so. Not crowded at all. And, the shirts and medals have improved over the past years. But, it’s very much a small town race so if you’re looking for BIG event like Big Cottonwood, Ogden or St. George — you won’t find it in Riverton. But, they do a good job given it’s a city race and the budget they work from.

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Anyways, going into race week after last week’s Emigration Canyon Half Marathon, I kind of viewed this race as another race toward my goal. But, that all kind of changed midweek.

This past week Coach Blu from Addict II Athlete posted a video on the AIIA Facebook Group page talking about the opidemic plaguing the nation. On average, there are 144 people nationwide that lose their lives to opiate addiction — overdose, suicide, etc. This is a staggering number. That’s over 52,500 people every year.

These 144 people are our brothers, sisters, parents, relatives, friends and neighbors. Chances are we know someone who struggles with the addiction — and it’s sometimes difficult to see. Especially since so many of these drugs are prescriptions. Coach then challenged us, the team, to share this message through social media showing the world — and specifically these 144 — how wonderful a life of sobriety is, by hashtagging #144 in our posts.

After watching Coach’s video I soon realized that my race this weekend in Riverton was going to be my 144th race! I couldn’t believe the coincidence. But, then again, I did — because I’ve learned since knowing Blu coincidences DON’T happen between the two of us. I strongly feel this was meant to happen this way.

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I decided that I wanted to run this race in honor and memory of not just the 144, but for the AIIA team and my friends and family members that have lost their battle already. I didn’t anticipate going into this race with THIS much emotion, but in just a few short days — here I was.

I wanted to run in silence in their memory. Something that is — obviously — difficult for me to do. I’m a social runner, I love making conversation with anyone out on the course, at the aid stations or in the Honey Buckets. Well, okay, not in the Honey Buckets. But, you get the idea. This would be a sacrifice for me, but it would also be an opportunity for me to focus my attention on the message, on the 144, on my loved ones and the AIIA team. So that’s what I set out to do.

I knew race day was going to be rainy, but when I left my house that morning I didn’t expect it to be THAT rainy. It was cold and pretty much a downpour. I knew from social media posts that the Strider’s Winter Circuit Half Marathon in Eden was already cancelled because of the weather. I was just hoping my race wouldn’t be as well.

I thought about checking the race’s Facebook page, but I kind of made up my mind that even if it was cancelled I was still going to run the course. As bad as the rain was, I knew it couldn’t be as bad as the Ogden Marathon this past year. Nothing could. So, I was just going to drive to the race and hope there was going to be a supported race.

The commute was pretty wet, but luckily once I got to Riverton the rain wasn’t as heavy and the race was on. So after picking up my race packet I went back to my car to stay dry for a little longer. I knew I would end up drenched. Plus, I didn’t really feel like socializing much, just because of the nature of the run. I was already beginning to get emotional about it all.

At the sound of the gun, I stood back for a couple minutes to let the crowd go. I plugged in my headphones and set out to run. I started out running to some MoTab and some other classic music, but I ended up just turning it all off. Mainly, because I wanted to focus and center my thoughts on the purpose of my run — so it was easier to just turn off the music altogether.

I kept my vow of silence pretty much throughout the run, with a few exceptions. I ran into a Facebook friend out on the Jordan River Parkway, I did stop to say hello briefly. And, after staying silent for the first couple of aid stations I decided to at least say “thank you” instead of trying to say it with sign language. Besides, I don’t know if I was signing “thank you” right anyways.

But, I just focused running alone in my thoughts. And, it was a rather somber run. The rain was pretty persistent throughout the whole run. It didn’t let up until about mile 11 or so for me. I almost wished it kept raining because the sun came out and the last mile and a half were pretty warm. With my jacket and hat I felt like I was running in a sauna.

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The run as a whole was really emotional for me. I caught myself a lot in thought of friends and family members who lost battles with opiate addiction. I thought about the AIIA team and how so many of them fought to overcome their addictions.. I thought about the message of the team and how important it is to carry it’s message, because it can save lives.

The last mile was pretty uncomfortable for me physically. Between the increasing temperature and normal race fatigue, my sprained ankle was also flaring up a bit as well. But, that all felt secondary. I just focused on that finish line and the message of the team.

I got to the finish line in 3:05:11, not the best time. But, there wasn’t really a goal time for this race. After last week’s Emigration Canyon Half, where I pushed myself, I knew I’d have to pull pack just a tad. So I was happy with the finish time. I didn’t feel like I went backwards from the progress I made last week.

After refueling with some Gatorade and bananas I made the trek back to my car where I sat there for a while in silence. The culmination of everything just built up and I got rather emotional. It honestly kind of surprised me, because I don’t easily get emotional — I mean — I do, but it takes me a bit to get to that point. I was just grateful to be able to carry the banner of the team.

So what was assumed to be “just another race” became a race I’ll remember for many reasons. It was an emotional run for me. And, a moment I hope that someone out there that can draw inspiration from to make a change in their own lives. Whether that is moving toward living a life of sobriety — or simply resolving to live life more fully.

The focus now turns to the Saltair Half this upcoming weekend. I don’t have a game plan yet. But, I’d like to get a sub-three time, especially since I won’t be racing the following week due to PrepperCon. But, all of that is secondary, because my focus is on the Salt Flats 50K at the end of the month.

And, I can’t wait.


MY NEXT FIVE RACES


It’s hard to believe this was five years ago today. But, I share this picture every year on this date, because this is what LOVE looks like to me. This was right after my Mom’s double mastectomy and the moment my parents were reunited post surgery on what was their 38th wedding anniversary. What has struck me about this photo is the love in both their eyes. The concern and hope of my father and complete devotion of my mother. I can’t remember what was said, but words can’t convey the whole message being shared. There’s a lot to celebrate today. Not just for my Mom being five years cancer free, but 43 years of marriage for my parents. The decision they made over four decades ago set the tone for our family and the searches all us kids would make in finding a spouse. If I’ve learned anything from my parents’ relationship it’s that no matter what trial is in front of you, it’s tackled together in love, faith and devotion to each other. Which is symbolized so well in this picture.

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RACE #144: Riverton Half Marathon; April 8, 2017 (3:05:11) Did you know that on average 144 people lose their lives DAILY to opiate addiction? These are our brothers, sisters, parents, family, friends and neighbors. Utah is no exception to this opidemic. This week, Coach Blu challenged us Addict II Athlete athletes to show these 144 people the lives they’re missing not living a life of sobriety. He wants us flood social media with the hashtag #144 with the moments they’re missing out on in life. It was no coincidence that Coach would ask us this week, the week of my 144th race in my 180 goal. I’ve stopped believing in coincidences with Blu. So I made the decision to dedicate this run to the 144. I wanted to dedicate it to the family and friends I’ve lost to addiction. I wanted to dedicate it to my AIIA family. So I set out to run it in silence. Which I almost did. I muttered a few “thank yous” at aid stations and a couple hellos, but I just kept to myself with my heart and mind on the meaning of this run. The rain was persistent nearly throughout the whole race. I had soggy feet and cold hands. But, I didn’t care. My heart and mind took my attention elsewhere. It was a very emotional run for me. Especially as neared the finish line. I kept repeating in my head, “You are a Warrior! You have erased and replaced your addictions. Your mess is message.” All mottos of the AIIA team. After crossing the finish line and grabbing a few bananas, I just sat in my car for a while and kind of wept. It was a lot of emotion to process for me. I want this run — and my journey — to hopefully be a beacon for someone, anyone, to have the courage to take that first step toward a better life. That’s one reason why I share so much of my journey on my blog and social media. I know if I can do hard and difficult things like 50 milers and Marathons — others do hard and difficult things too. And, sometimes it takes someone else sharing their light to ignite that spark. If you struggle with addiction and you need help … REACH OUT! Life is too beautiful to let it pass by. #race144 #rivertonhalf #running @fight4phat @joshruns180 @josherwalla @addicttoathlete

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Kids are exhausting. Cute. But, exhausting.

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If you’re a model, would you put this in your portfolio?

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People sometimes worry about me being single and all. But, they needn’t worry about me … I get plenty of dates.

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Weekly Review

Last weekend at the tail end of my race down Emigration Canyon I rolled my ankle and sprained fairly good. Not fun at all. I did a couple slow runs mid-week to help straighten things out, but it was pretty sore the whole week. Not what I wanted or expected for my training.

And, I won’t lie, it’s been a frustrating month of ups and downs for my runs. If it’s not my ankle, it’s my back or this week — oral surgery. I’m having a root canal on Wednesday, so I am not sure what to expect from my running this week? I have a race on Saturday, but I’d like to get a run or two in before then.

Ugh. I just need to have patience that it’ll all work out. But, I’m getting a little anxious with my 50K coming up at the end of the month.

Weekly Miles

Running Miles — 4.0 miles
Race Miles — 13.1 miles
Walking Miles — 21.32 miles
TOTAL MILES — 38.42 miles
Race(s) this week — Riverton Half.

April 2017 Miles

Running Miles — 4.0 miles
Race Miles — 26.2 miles
Walking Miles — 24.02 miles
TOTAL MILES — 54.22 miles
Races in April — Emigration Canyon Half Marathon, Riverton Half, Saltair Half, Salt Flats 50K and Tulip Festival Half

2017 Miles

Running Miles — 185.75 miles
Race Miles — 122.32 miles
Walking Miles — 349.48 miles
TOTAL MILES — 657.55 miles
Races done in 2017 — New Year’s Half Marathon, Sweethearts 5K, Jackpot Running Festival, SL Tri Club Indoor Half, March Madness Half, Lucky 13 Half Marathon, Emigration Canyon Half Marathon and Riverton Half.



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RACE #141: March Madness Half Marathon

One thing I love about endurance sports — specifically running — is unlike other sports, like most team sports, the venue changes from event to event. And, the outcome is up to you, not necessarily how you and your teammates work together on an uniform and familiar playing field.

In running — especially distance running — distances may be the same, but courses (or playing fields) all differ. And, I love that. A race down Big Cottonwood Canyon is going to be completely different from around the neighborhoods of South Jordan, the trails of the Bonneville Lakeshore Trail or around the Utah Olympic Oval in Kearns.

Then on top of that you’re going to face many different variables — dealing with anything from weather, your training preparation, your fueling, your mental state, etc., etc., etc., etc. That’s why racing is so personal. It’s YOUR race — and nobody else’s. And, this race was very much a reminder of the importance of that mentality.

Going into the race — I didn’t know what to expect. Compared to last week when I ran the SL Track Club Indoor Half in Kearns — I wasn’t recovered from my previous week’s ultra. I felt it pretty early into my run. The legs were kicking and screaming trying to remind me of the hell I put them through the previous week.

This week — I felt more rested. My runs during the week weren’t fast, calculated or overly efforted. They were more shakeout runs. I just wanted to feel and do better than last week’s race. And, I think I got my legs there come Saturday morning.

I didn’t want to put a time goal on this race, because I haven’t been half marathon training — or maintaining. My training miles from December until February were pretty much all focused on my ultra. Meaning — they were long and slow miles.

In fact I am pretty sure the first 13 miles of my ultra took me over four hours? So speed work hasn’t been on the training docket for me for quite a while. Which I’m not worried about, because after my 50K in April I’ll be gearing my focus toward that anyway.

Anyways — despite all of the reasons why I shouldn’t or didn’t need to make a time goal. I did.

I simply wanted to run a sub-three hour half marathon. That seemed like a reasonable and doable goal. I’ve been losing weight, gaining more energy with my Hashimoto’s friendly diet and feeling strongly lately — so why not?

I knew it was going to be a challenge because of my lack of half training, still temperamental post-ultra legs and the flatness of the course. The race was along the Legacy Parkway Trail — which is flatter than flat. I guess there are some hills, but only people in Kansas would consider them hills — so they don’t count.

Anyways — I knew a flat course with my iron legs could be difficult to gauge an estimated time — but, I didn’t care. I just wanted that sub-three time. I felt like I could do it. So, that’s what I shot for.

When the race started my legs felt pretty good. Not amazingly good — but good. So this encouraged me. And, considering there was a pretty strong tailwind behind — I felt like a racehorse. So I kept trying to mentally push myself a little bit more per mile — just focusing on that effort here and there.

And, really, I felt great.

About 3-4 miles into the race I am starting to think that this goal was more than doable, but expected. I was really on cloud nine, because I felt great. A lot which I attributed to my diet changes and newfound energy.

But, around this time as I was beginning to see the runners return from the out and back return trip — I realized in dread. THIS AWESOME TAILWIND IS GOING TO TURN INTO A NASTY HEADWIND!

And, yeah, as I saw friends pass some of them made comments about the headwind. At this point I started dreading the turnaround point. Because, I’ve dealt with some nasty headwinds. None as horrific as the Ogden Marathon headwind — there’s no joy in a 30 MPH headwind in the rain. That was pure hell. But, I digress.

So while I knew it wasn’t going to be fun — I also knew it wasn’t going to be the worse either. And, thankfully it was not raining, otherwise I’d be singing a different tune.

Once I turned around the change was pretty immediate. There were some nasty gusts — the kind that make you kinda loose your breath for a second. But, the headwind was pretty constant.

After about a mile of just pushing through the wind — I gave myself two options for the last five or so miles. I could, one, keep running for that goal or, two, start walking a bunch and make the excuse that the wind was simply too hard and I got tired.

Luckily, I chose the first option. And, I just kept going.

I felt like if I pushed myself that I could still get my sub-three time. I had to try. I figured at the turn around I was on pace for about 2:40-2:45 — so I still had a shot.

I am glad I went with that decision, because I ran hard into that wind, but it was very, very difficult. It was a fight to keep running and it took A LOT out of me. My mile 10 — I felt like I was beyond empty.

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At this point I stopped looking at the watch, because I knew I was going to be cutting it close. The difference between directions was really that much. My legs started getting really tight because of the effort and threatened to cramp on a couple occasions. But, I kept going.

Around mile 11 — I found it easier and faster for me to mall walk some stretches. I hate resorting to it, because I always fear it will turn into a mosey. But, I focused on my stride and arm swinging (if I had two pound dumbbells I am positive I would have been MUCH faster) and it really helped relieve a lot of the strain on the quads. I focused on alternating between my mall walking and running in a 1:1 minute ratio.

And, for the most part that helped.

But, I was still on empty.

Once I got off the trail and back onto the streets toward the park I happened to glance at my watch to notice I had a minute to run the last 3/4 of a mile or so. I just kind of stared at that reality — and didn’t feel disappointment — at all. Besides feeling sore, dead and depleted — I felt proud. I felt strong. I felt — good.

That last stretch I had a conversation with myself — first, thanking me for deciding making excuses to walk and, second, realizing that my effort was beyond a sub-three effort. On pretty much any other course my effort that day WAS well below a sub-three time. And, I knew a windless — or even less windy day — that effort would give me a sub-three time.

And, to say and realize that — knowing I could have just started walking as a sign of defeat — made me really proud of myself.

I came in just over 3:06 hours. But, those six minutes were invisible to me.

Because, I got that goal.


NEXT FIVE RACES


So during my race today I saw a seemingly perfect banana laying on the side of the road. I was going to pick it up, but I figured … someone might have left it there for later. After I turned around and came back I noticed it was still there. I also noticed it was half eaten. Being a hungered, I looked at it (checked it for needles … I was taught that from Trick or Treating in the 80’s), ripped off the tip where it was a bit bruised … and I ate it. So whoever left that half eaten banana out on Legacy Parkway Trail this morning … THANK YOU! It saved me from cramping, it was delicious and was also the burst of energy I needed to do the last two miles. #race141 #marchmadnesshalf #running @joshruns180 @fit.phat

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Played LIFE™ with my 5 year old niece tonight … guess who got married before me? #yepshedid #likereallife

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RUNNING MILES

119.65 miles

RACE MILES

83.02 miles

WALKING MILES

167.56 miles

TOTAL MILES TO DATE

370.23 miles



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The Post Ultra Blues …

I love ultras.

But, I hate the ultra aftermath.

The recovery period. The aches. The pain. The questioning your sanity (well okay that’s an everyday occurrence). And, of course, the general blues.

I’ve accepted the ‘running blues’ — or whatever you want to call them — for pretty much anything over a marathon. The week after a long race I usually get into a funk for a couple days. Part of it is that I usually take 2-3 days extra to let my legs recover and that tends to make me somewhat cranky.

Anyways — that’s been me this week.

My hips and butt (I’m sure there’s a more couth way of saying that) have been hurting a bit longer than usual. I tried to shake it out on Tuesday and Wednesday and got a couple miles in — but, it was a bit too much, especially for the hips. Afterall, they don’t lie.

I even tried playing basketball last night, but ended up only playing for about five minutes in the first half. It was a close game and we had a deep bench, so I let the fresher legs have at it. It was fun just watching the game — which we ultimately won in the last minute.

As sore as I am — I already signed up for next year’s Jackpot Running Festival. That’s something funny about runners — even ultrarunners. We can be dying right after a 50, 100 or 200 mile run and ask when we can sign up for next year.

I swear we’re masochists at times.

But, I am looking forward to getting back into the swing of my runs and workouts next week. I do have a race this weekend — thankfully indoors — at the Olympic Oval. I am running the half marathon at the SL Track Club’s Indoor Tri. I am going to use the word ‘running’ loosely here. Especially if my hips are going to get sassy.

But, it’s all about moving forward. And, that’s what I am doing.

Step by step.


Not today Satan. Not today. #postultralegs

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Not today Satan. Not today. #postultralegs

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Not today Satan. Not today. #postultralegs

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How Joshua is getting his groove back …

First off, I’m no Stella. Thank goodness. I’d make a horrible woman. But, that’s a post for another day. But, after a month from my last race — it’s time to get my groove back.

As I have posted before — I took a couple of weeks off from running. Justifiably so. I ran a lot of miles between mid-August to early November. A couple of 20 milers, a handful of half marathons, three marathons, a 50 miler and then my 50K — my last race.

I was burnt out. I was tired. I was sick of running (GASP! — hey, I’ll admit it when it happens). So I took some time off. Focused on weight and strength training and didn’t worry about my mileage. At all. I was a nice running sabbatical.

But, after Thanksgiving and a stupid cold — I’m ready to get my groove back. I’m ready to get into a stricter routine than what I’ve been holding myself to last month (or not holding myself to). I’m really getting excited about my upcoming running year and as much as I could justify waiting to get the groove back after the first of the year — I’m refusing to play that game.

So the groove comes back now.

The groove is coming back now for a number of reasons. One, because now is the best time to start any new adventure/goal/plan. And, two, I’ve got nothing better to do with my life.

Okay, I lied about that last one. I’ve got plenty to do this month — and that’s why I’ve got to keep myself in line and disciplined. It’s so easy to let yourself go — with exercise, diet and motivation. We’ve all been there.

To help with that a friend of mine and I are working on keeping each other on track. We’re committing to at least two miles on the treadmill and then a new exercise to do each day.

For me personally, besides holding myself to that standard with my friend, I am planning on making the goal of walking on the treadmill any time I’m watching TV. I’m doing this to stay active, but it’s also great ultra training. Great, great, great ultra training — it’s time on my feet.

And, I’ll be doing a few 50Ks earlier in the year so I’ll need that time and training. Nothing prepares you for hours upon hours of endless ultrarunning like hours upon hours of endless treadmill running. I’ll be going to more detail about my training plan later this month — but, I’m not an outside runner during the week (mainly because I’m home only when it’s dark) so I have to rely on the treadmill for my miles.

But, I feel motivated. I feel excited. I am ready to get my groove back. To work on my mojo and get fitter than I was last year so my body can build the stamina it needs to make 2017 a great year.

Go, fight, win!

The Joshbys: Top 10 Race Medals of 2016

This past year I’ve run some 20+ races. Well, more like 25. I had a few 5K races in there as well. But, I’ve collected quite the cache of race medals in 2016. Lots of blingity bling.

As I have done the past couple of years I like to rank my favorites. There’s really no formula in my ranking. Other than what the medal means to me personally and whether or not I love the design.

I will admit that I am a sucker for big heavy medals. If I’m running 13.1 or more miles who doesn’t want a hunking piece of medal wrapped around their neck after the accomplishment? If I can’t feel the medal tugging on my neck than it’s not a very good medal.

Anyways, without any further adieu, here are my Top 10 race medals of 2016 …

1) Pony Express 50

Okay, this medal is tiny. The picture might make it appear bigger than it really is, but it’s pretty small. BUT — and that’s a big but — I love it. Not only do I like the simplistic design, but I love what it means to me.

I absolutely earned this medal. All 50 miles of the race. When I stare at this medal I think of all the training that went into this race and then all 50 miles of the race. I think of the miles spent running with Coach Blu, Jill and Jed. I think of the solo miles. And, the heaven and hell that was mile 45.

This medal has  is priceless to me and that’s what it earns the top spot of 2016.

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2) The Haunted Half

Okay, I’m a little biased about this race medal, because I had a hand in the design. But, seriously, I absolutely love the sugar skull medal. I love the size, the design and colors. They just pop. Their festive and everything you’d want in a fun Halloween medal.

But, I know I’m not alone on that assessment, I number of people who ran The Haunted Half loved the size and design. And, I think if I hadn’t ran my 50 this year this would have earned the top spot.

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3) Revel Big Cottonwood Marathon

I’ve always loved Revel’s race medals. I’ve ran the race since the inaugural race back in 2012 and each year the medals get better and better. This year’s medal is a true paperweight — classy and shiny.

I would race Revel races just for the medals, but they do a great job all around on their races — from the swag bags to race shirts to race logistics. A class organization that’s definitely portrayed through the race medal.

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4) Timp Half

Another paperweight medal. But, I love the Timp Half. I love the clean gold look and it really is a hefty medal. Plus, when I brought it home my niece thought I won an Olympic gold medal. I may or may not have corrected her.

A photo posted by Joshua Hansen (@fight4phat) on

5) St. George Marathon

This was the third St. George Marathon that I’ve ran. And, quite honestly, I’ve grown to love the medals. They haven’t changed much since 2012. I remember getting handed it and thinking two things — “that’s small” and “did someone cut this out of a kitchen counter?”

But, you know what? After running the marathon a few extra times — I get it. It really embodies the marathon and surrounding area. The red rock feel is gorgeous AND each medal is different. They’re all unique, just like everyone’s race. No one race — or medal — is the same.

That’s why I’ll always love these medals.

A photo posted by Josher (@josherwalla) on

6) Ogden Half Marathon

Ogden has had some pretty awesome medals in the past. The past few years they’ve gotten heavier and bigger — which is good. My favorite is still the gold medal from 2013 and this one is good too. Not their best, but whenever I look at this medal I’ll always remember my experience swimming to the finish line.

Then again, I’ll have a similar experience pretty much everytime I look at any of my Ogden race medals.

A photo posted by Joshua Hansen (@fight4phat) on

7) Bountiful Handcart Days Half Marathon

The Handcarts Days Half will always hold a special place in my heart (it was my first half). And, thankfully, over the years their medals have gotten better and better. I really liked last year’s race medal, but this one is awesome as well.

I love the pioneer spoke and colors. I’m not a HUGE fan of very colorful medals (unless designed well), because they can go overboard. But, I like the muted colors that go with the pioneer theme quite well.

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8) AF Canyon Race Against Cancer

I love the size of the AF medal, but compared to last year’s medal — it’s a tad too busy. I do love the colors — blue and green — they pop well together. Still a very solid medal, but I love the simple AF logo medal from last year. Which ranked higher than this year’s medal.

A photo posted by Joshua Hansen (@fight4phat) on

9) Ragnar Relay Wasatch Back

RAGNAAAAAAR!!! I love all of my Ragnar medals. I love the amount of detail put into each one. My biggest gripe (if you would want to call it that) is that shape of the medal. It’s not balanced very well and sits on your neck kinda crooked. Still one of my favorites compared to year’s past.

The other thing I love about these is how each medal has a saying that is revealed when your team puts their medals together. That is really cool. And, really hits on the team aspect of Ragnar.

A photo posted by Joshua Hansen (@fight4phat) on

10) Red Rock Relay Park City

This is a solid medal. I love the simple clean look. I love monochrome medals and this is definitely monochrome. I do wish the the imprint of the medal was a bit more definitive. It becomes a bit too difficult to make out the design in certain light.

But, other than that — I love this medal and the memories associated with it. It is a cherished.

A photo posted by Joshua Hansen (@fight4phat) on

Goals for tomorrow’s 50K …

So as some of you may know — I’m running the Antelope Island Classic 50K tomorrow morning — well, okay, all day. Let’s be honest here, it’ll probably take me the full 10 hours like last year. But, that’s beside the point.

This is my third ultra in the past year. In fact this race was my first ultra marathon — unless you count the Utah Valley Marathon in 2014 where I got lost. But, again — I digress. And, after running my first 50 miler a couple weekends okay, I feel fairly versed in the ultrarunning universe (which should read — total rookie).

But, I know what to expect and what not to expect. Especially with this race. For one, it’ll be no walk in the park — though I’ll be mostly walking … in … a state park. And, these beasts are nothing like marathons. I mean what marathon gives you salted potatoes, potato chips, M&M’s and everything not found a whole food diet at every aid station? (this is why I love ultras … taps into my inner fat kid).

I was initially going to run the half marathon, but after my 50 miler and getting the itch for distance I decided to up my registration to the 50K. Having ran this course last year gave me the confidence to know that I could do it again. Being 25-30lbs. lighter also helps. But, just knowing the course and knowing where I can push or hold back helps a lot.

So here I am on the brink of running ultra #3 — and I can’t be any more excited about it.

Like my marathons, I don’t have a time goal for my ultras. Well, I guess I do — my time goal is to finish and not be swept off the course. I came close last year on this course. But, that didn’t defer me from doing this again — because as I mentioned before, knowing the course and being lighter than last year helps.

But, I do goals for my race tomorrow and when I cross the finish line tomorrow afternoon I want to be able to look back and not only be satisfied with another ultra finish, but knowing that I met these goals as well …

Don’t Poop My Pants

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You’re probably laughing at this being on my list, but really, honestly, no joking — this is my goal for any run. Not just race, but run. The worst thing I can think happening to myself out on a run is pooping my pants. Especially, if I couldn’t tell I had, but everyone else around me could. And, I’d like to think that I am not the only runner who has this worry and goal.

When I ran my 50 miler a couple weeks ago this was a BIG worry for me. Forget about the miles of death I experienced late in my race, I was more worried about my bathroom situation, because the only port-a-potties were 50 miles apart. Yep — at the starting and finish line.

And, of course I had to use it about four miles into my race. Luckily for me it was still dark so I walked far out into the desert pretending to admire the scenery before doing my morning squats before burying it like a cat in a litterbox. Luckily, all went well and that was the only time I had to “take care of business” because it was a big deal for me.

Yet, that’s really the only time I’ve gone outside of port-a-potty during the middle of a run. And, with me running more trails I know it won’t be the last. But, it still worries the heck out of me. The whole idea of using it roadside with the full moon out worries me. But, there’s no modesty in ultrarunning and I have to remember that.

So, yeah, don’t poop my pants.

Don’t Flirt with Cut-off Times

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Last year when I ran this race with Tim we came UBER close to 2 of the 3 cutoff times. We were slowed down a bit by an injury which made us a bit slower. To make sure we got the last cutoff we had to book it the 2-3 miles between the two aid-stations. It wasn’t fun at mile 23-25 after having ran all day.

So, my goal is to not even flirt with them this year. I am not TOO worried about getting as close as last year, but I want to stay mindful of them — especially as I am “running” the hills between miles 11-14. That will be my slowest miles for sure.

But, the plan is once I get to the mile 14 aid station I’ll pick up the pace as I descend down the mountain and towards the ranch. That stretch we walked and killed our time. That should put me in a good position to cut off a hour or so from last year’s time.

But, just being used to the course and being lighter than last year will help. I just don’t want the time to have such a daunting presence as it was last year. I want to enjoy the scenery and time out on the trails.

Don’t Get Friendly with Earl

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The picture above is from a few years back at this race. And, if you’re wondering what that buffalo (nicknamed affectionately Earl) is doing — he is pinning a man (who got too close to Earl) against the fence. And, surprisingly, the man came away unscathed (except from probably his underwear).

Anyways — I’m kinda surprised I still picked to make this my first ultra after seeing this. Especially considering I have problems when I see lawn furniture that might look like deer. I have a slight fear of hooved animals — especially when it comes to deer, moose, elk and anything that pretends to be cuddly and lovable when it’s obvious it has alternative motives.

I haven’t had many encounters with buffalo — outside of Yellowstone from the safety of my car, but I’ve kinda clumped them into that same category. .I just don’t want to run into one unexpectedly — anywhere — whether it’s on this run or in life.

Last year I only had one run in with a buffalo that made me feel uncomfortable. It was in the last two miles of the race and this dang buffalo defiantly stood on the trail I had to pass. I stood there not knowing what to do and the buffalo stood there like a jerk knowing I didn’t know what to do.

Then a runner behind us starting flailing their hands and making a lot of noise — at first to my horror — but, then I saw the buffalo simply move on. He didn’t want any part of this runners mojo and he moved on. The runner explained to Tim and I that they’re like cattle and as long as you aren’t threatening them and make noise they’ll move on.

Duly noted.

Now, does that make me a buffalo whisperer all of the sudden? Hell no. Am I still worried about buffalo? Hell yes. If I encounter a cranky buffalo during my race I’ll try that runner’s approach, but I am not sure how much confidence I have in it?

If it doesn’t budge I am not sure exactly what to do next? Do I ask it nicely to move? Do I put on some Celine Dion to get it to move on (I know that would work for me)?

The simple answer is probably finding a roundabout route. But, I’m also praying it never comes to that. I want to enjoy the buffalo — from a distance. And, that’s about it.

Make a new friend out on the trails — but, preferably not with Earl

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I hate to put this goal in the same boat as my goal of not pooping my pants, but this is another one of my ‘every run’ goals. I’m just a people person (if you couldn’t tell). I love meeting new people while out on my running adventures. This is one reason why I love pacing and sweeping — you never know who’re going to meet.

I know a few people running the 50K, but they’re pretty much faster than me — which is fine. I don’t hate them for that (I just hate them for getting to the buffalo chili before me). And, since I am doing this race solo — unlike last year, I’m sure what adventure is ahead of me?

I’m coming prepared to jam out by myself with my killer trail running soundtrack, but I’d much prefer not to use that for most of the race. I want to make some new friends, especially with back of the packers (my people). And, hopefully, when I make new friends tomorrow they’re also buffalo whisperers so I don’t have to do that myself.

Whatever the case is, I’d really love to make a new friend or two out thur on the trails. Trails are so much more fun when you’re out there with people you like.

Especially when they’re not afraid of hooved animals.

Have ULTRA amounts of FUN!

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No matter the race, distance or pace — my goal is to ALWAYS have the most amount of fun possible. I wouldn’t be running otherwise. Running has been a huge blessing in my life that has brought a lot of joy into — so whether I am out on the roads or trails — I’m going to have fun.

And, tomorrow is no different. I’m going to have a blast out there! I’m going to make new friends, see old friends, conquer hills and put my legs on cruise control enjoying the scenery. Is there anything else I can ask for to make it even more perfect? Not much.

I’m ready for this adventure and challenge ahead of me. I know it won’t be easy, but that’s why I love it. I love the challenge ahead of me and I can’t wait to see what lessons lay ahead. But, you better believe me — I’ll be striving for all of that while aiming to have the most amount of fun possible.

That’s the only way I know how to run.

So there it is, my goals for tomorrow’s race. As I stated above, I am excited for this race. I feel prepared. I feel ready. I feel eager. I just want to get out there and run.

People think I am crazy for doing this … and I won’t correct them, because there is degree of madness involved in ultrarunning. But, there is absolutely nothing better than just BEING in the moment and running something that is beyond comprehension to an older self.

5-6-7 years ago this would be unimaginable.

But, here I am.

And, I’m ready to run!

Come back on Sunday for my race pictures and then next Tuesday or Wednesday I’ll have a detailed race report.

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